By ALICIA DE HALDEVANG,  Posted on » Saturday, April 16, 2011

CHILDREN at Bahraini schools are being taught the value of laughter as part of their official studies.

It follows the inclusion of “laughter yoga” in the Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE) curriculum in India.

As a result, five schools in Bahrain that follow the CBSE curriculum have started laughter lessons as part of a health and medicine course.

The classes are being taught at The Indian School, New Millennium School Bahrain – DPS, Al Noor International School, Asian School and Ibn Al Haitham Islamic School

Laughter yoga, which is taught at two clubs in Bahrain by a certified teacher, is now included in the high school syllabus for pupils in class 10 at each of these schools.

“In such schools, laughter yoga breaks are held whenever the teachers feel that the children are getting tired, restless or are no longer listening to lectures,” said Bahrain’s only certified laughter yoga instructor K M Thomas.

“Five to 10-minute breaks help stimulate their minds and re-energise their bodies.

“These schools have reported a happy, positive change in attitude and most importantly, zero absenteeism.”

The Indian government’s education department included laughter classes in the CBSE curriculum to raise awareness of the benefits.

Students will be taught the scientific effects of laughter on the mind and body, before being tested on it during end of year examinations next March.

Mr Thomas said laughter yoga sessions are already held in various schools in India during morning assemblies, but have now been exported to schools outside India due to their success.

He explained the concept behind injecting laughter into schoolwork was to reduce stress levels among children, who may be under pressure from parents and teachers to excel.

“Children are constantly pressured by parents to perform better and these expectations can lead the children to strive for unrealistic goals, which if unfulfilled can bring on serious stress and prove to be detrimental to their mental and physical health,” he said.

“Laughter yoga is the best technique which inducts more laughter into children’s lives and it has proved very effective when incorporated in the education system, as it helps to eliminate factors that cause stress levels among students and hinder healthy relationships.

“As they learn to laugh unconditionally, they become adept at handling pressure as laughter builds self-confidence and the ability to handle stress by boosting the immune system and releasing endorphins in the brain which kick-start good feelings and reduce stress.”

The idea that laughter has a positive effect on the body stems from research by American psychologist William James in 1884.

He found that a person’s mental state, whether positive or negative, influenced the behaviour of the body.

This connection was developed further by Indian doctor Dr Madan Kataria, who established the first Laughter Club in 1995 and developed breathing and laughter exercises to help members release stress.

Mr Thomas now runs monthly laughter yoga sessions at World Beat Fitness Centre, Janabiyah, and at the Kerala Catholic Association (KCA), Segaiya.


deaf and mute people having fun with laughter yoga , jo-dee walmsleyEmmy Liana Dewi, Indonesia: Our Certified laughter Yoga Teacher Emmy has started laughter yoga with a centre of deaf in Indonesia and she says it was great and everyone loved it. This is going to be ongoing project and we will keep you posted about the developments. Perhaps we can find out after few weeks and months if they had any improvement in their hearing. In December last year we had a presentation in Indian Laughter Yoga conference where a group of deaf and mute children had significant improvement in their speech after doing Laughter Yoga. Children love laughing so much that they ask for it more and more. Emmy was trained as LY teacher in Bangalore India a few year ago and she is spread Laughter Yoga in Indonesia.mute and deaf  people having fun with Laughter yoga and jodee walmsley


Melbourne Herald Sun
STRESSED workers fretting about workloads and redundancies are turning to feelgood techniques once dismissed as barking mad.

A new study from Deakin University’s School of Psychology on the effects of laughter yoga – where even the most serious employees are reduced to hysterics – has found it has a real and positive effect on workplace wellbeing weeks after the sessions are finished.

Using validated psychological methods, workplace wellbeing and overall job satisfaction increased by about 6 per cent to 73 per cent.

Dr Melissa Weinberg, who works on the Australian Unity Wellbeing Index, said getting even small increases in people’s natural levels of wellbeing is difficult so a change of this magnitude is significant.
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This increase was measured three weeks after the sessions of people doing yoga breathing techniques and simulating laughter until they simply can’t stop.

The trials were conducted inside traditional office-based businesses.

With 420,000 Australians made redundant or retrenched in the 12 months to February this year, according to the Australian Bureau of Statistics, the move is part of a wider trend of employers looking for increasingly unorthodox ways to keep their staff happier and thus more productive.

Organisations such as Australia Post, accountancy giants KPMG, insurer AON and the Australian Securities and Investments Commission have all been involved in recent years.

Dr Weinberg – the study’s author – said laughter yoga had an immediate increase in mood – which is the primary driver of wellbeing.

“We saw an increase in the sense of optimism, sense of control and overall life satisfaction,” Dr Weinberg said.

“It had helped to facilitate the connection between people at work and made them feel more comfortable about being there.

“Just that the employers had done something to boost their workers’ wellbeing was also significant factor.

“It’s free, it’s easy and everyone can do it. It works for people who have been going through a tough time and looking for a booster. We found an increased wellbeing for people who were already quite happy.”

Laughter Yoga CEO Merv Neal said he was laughed out of offices ten years ago as being insane, but things have changed.

“There is a huge need for anything in business – it doesn’t necessarily have to be laughter yoga – that helps employees manage the stress they are under at the moment,” he said.

“There are so many rules at work now that we are losing that social connection. Touching and laughing are critical for good human relationships.”


By Leland Kim

HONOLULU (KHNL) – It’s often said, laughter is the best medicine.

And for one group of international students, it’s also a way to break through cultural barriers, and connect.

Laughter yoga has been around for about a decade, but its popularity has recently grown.

It is taught in more than 50 countries and this phenomenon has now reached our island shores.

Call it silly. Call it unique.

But whatever you call it, this innovative take on yoga is contagious.

“It’s so much fun. Initially it seems kind of silly but by the end, it’s just amazing,” said student Cate Smith.

Students at Hawaii Tokai International College speak many different languages, but through laughter yoga, they all share a common language.

“This is pretty unique, because nobody talked about this before,” said Jong Hoon Chae, an international student.

The school is using it to build cultural bridges, while encouraging students to let loose and have fun.

“Laughter is just something that’s universal, and it doesn’t matter where you’re from, you understand that,” said Dr. Douglas Fuqua, the college’s vice chancellor.

As they come out of their shells, it’s a way to expand their horizons.

“I’m very shy so difficult to open my mind, but when I can do it, it’s very interesting and fun,” said another international student, Yusuke Kawanishi.

Some even want to bring laughter yoga back home.

“It’s pretty fun. I want to let Koreans know about this Laughter Yoga and let them know how good it is,” Chae told us.

In the end, it’s about sharing a part of themselves.

“People all laugh in the same language,” said Smith. “It’s a lot of fun.”

There are more than 5,000 laughter yoga clubs throughout the world, including one here in Hawaii.


By Marlo Sollitto
For family caregivers, the mountains of laundry, the endless messes that need cleaned up, the rushing to doctor’s appointments, the complete surrender of one’s personal life and the painful process of watching a loved one’s decline is no laughing matter. You may feel like crying more often than you feel like laughing.

But many experts say that laughing in even the grimmest situations is good for you, both mentally and physically. Laughter releases stress, strengthens the immune system, improves sleep, diffuses tension, reduces pain and boosts “happy chemistry.” Laughter is the nemesis of tension; you can’t hold on to tension when you laugh.

The Science of Laughter: Nothing to Joke About

Numerous scientific studies suggest that laughter is a powerful form of complementary therapeutic medicine:

Blood flow. Laughter causes the tissue that forms the inner lining of blood vessels to dilate or expand in order to increase blood flow. (University of Maryland School of Medicine)
Immune response. Humor raises the level of infection-fighting antibodies and immune cells. (Robert Provine, professor of psychology, author of Laughter: A Scientific Investigation)
Blood pressure. Laughter lowers blood pressure just as much as cutting salt. (Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine)
Pain relief. Ten minutes of laughing can allow up to two hours of pain relief. In a study of patients in a rehabilitation center, 74% agreed with the statement, “sometimes, laughter works as well as a pain pill.” (New England Journal of Medicine)
Aerobic exercise. One minute of laughter is equal to 10-minutes on the rowing machine. (Dr. William Fry, Stanford University)

Fake It ‘Til You Make It

To reap the benefits of laugher, you don’t need to be happy; you don’t need a reason to laugh. You can fake it. “The body cannot differentiate between fake and real laughter. You get the same physiological and psychological benefits,” says Sebastien Gendry, renowned yoga instructor and CEO of the American School of Laughter Yoga. “We change physiologically when we laugh. We stretch muscles in our face and body, our pulse and blood pressure go up, and we breathe faster, which sends more oxygen to our tissues.”

Laughing is Human Nature

The benefits of laughter may be tied to human physiology. “Babies laugh long before they can talk,” psychologist and laughter coach Annette Goodheart explains. “Laughing is a wonderful, cathartic process,” Dr. Goodheart says. “I’ve worked with Auschwitz survivors who told me that the people who were able to laugh were the ones who survived.”

Just because you laugh doesn’t mean you don’t care. Laughing during even saddest situations helps you deal with emotions, rather than keeping feelings bottled up. Sometimes, faking laughter may lead to tears, but that’s OK, Gendry says. “You cannot open up a box of emotions selectively. A good laugh may lead to a good cry. Having a good cry feels good, too. If you have unexpressed emotions, laughter will bring them out.”

Life isn’t funny, particularly when dealing with people who are dying. Laughter forces you to be at peace with who you are, where you are. No one has a perfect life. “Laughter therapy is about how you react in the face of diversity. Sometimes, you can’t control your circumstances, but you can always control your reaction. How you react is always negotiable,” Gendry says

How to Laugh When You Don’t Feel Like It

Anyone can laugh for no reason, without relying on humor, jokes or comedy. Here are seven laughter exercises that you can try at home (provided by the American School Of Laughter Yoga):

Gradient laughter: Fake a smile, giggle, then laugh slowly and gradually increase tempo and volume.
Hearty Laughter: Spread your arms up, look up and laugh heartily.
Don’t Know Why I Am Laughing: Laugh (fake is perfectly fine) and shrug your shoulders as you look at yourself in a mirror and try to convey the message with your eyes and body language “I absolutely don’t know why I am laughing.”
Find Your Laughter Center: Probe your head with one finger as if looking for your laughter center. Imagine that each spot you push on triggers a different laughter sound.
Figure Of Eight Laughter: Laugh as you draw several imaginary figures of eight in the air with your head, shoulders, hips, knees.
Mental Floss Laughter: Move your hands sideways on either side of your head as if you were flossing your brain (why not?) and laugh as you do so.
Conductor Laughter: Imagine you are a conductor. Direct an imaginary orchestra with enthusiastic arm movements as you sing a song of your choice in laughter sounds only (“ho ho ho” or “ha ha ha”).


Laughter and Diabetes:-
Diabetes is emerging as a major health hazard worldwide. Japanese scientist Murakami’s experiment to ascertain the effect of laughter on the blood sugar levels has affirmed that laughter has a lowering impact on blood sugar. Murakami identified 23 genes that can be activated with laughter. In addition, it also reduces the stress hormone cortisol responsible for increase in sugar levels and stabilizes the immune system, which if weakened, can affect the production of insulin in the pancreas.


Thursday, 01 November 2012 16:43

Heath and wellnes improved by Laughter YogaHere is an interesting article by wellness coach Carolanne Wright who firmly believes that in order to see change in the world; we need to be the change. She reaffirms the effectiveness of laughter as one of the important tools for body – mind wellness. One of the many ideas she advocates to spark laughter in one’s life is to join a Laughter Club and do Laughter Yoga which helps people to learn to how to laugh unconditionally, without any jokes, humor or comedy.

Excerpt:

A young child can laugh over 300 times a day whereas an adult will chuckle a fraction of this amount — often much less, if at all. It’s no joke. When life is taken too seriously, we are missing out on one of the greatest health boosting habits around. Feel good endorphins, pain management, lower blood pressure, protection from illness, a sharper mind — just a few perks a little mirth can supply. Laughter makes people smarter, more productive and more positive in dealing with life’s challenges.

As it turns out, a good sense of humor is essential for thriving health. Not only is it pleasurable; laughter stimulates the heart and lungs, relieves stress and strengthens the immune system. It even enhances the intake of oxygen, stimulates circulation and relaxes the muscles — benefiting major organs and triggering the release of endorphins. This, in turn, leads to more happy states of enjoyment. Having a lively laugh also relieves discomfort by prompting the body to produce natural painkillers and interrupts the pain-spasm cycle of muscle disorders as well.

Research has shown that laughter sharpens the mind and broadens thinking – allows for adaptation to changing circumstances and spurs creativity. With all the doom and gloom these days, it is important to offset the negativity with a guffaw here and there. A good dose of comic merriment and camaraderie will lighten life, improve the mind and relax the body. It may even make you healthier to boot.

To read full report click here:

Courtesy: Natural N


Elvie Estavillo: Laughter Yoga changes a person the minute they laugh, making their outlook on the world around vibrant, multi-rainbow-colored, and positive! That was exactly what happened during the Laughter Yoga session I had with the 100 employees of Miladay Jewels, Inc. at Citadel Condominium Penthouse.

stress relief, depression in Dubai, CairoThe Dayrit sisters — Jaqui, Christine, Michelle, and Yvonne came in full force, and just like their employees danced, swayed, and laughed, much to their hearts’ delight. Michelle, as usual, was in her best element. She danced and jazzed merrily, with no care in the world, all through the session. No one who saw her then would believe she is battling the Big C, as she cruised the room laughingly from end to end — making her the dancing Laughter Yoga queen! Yeheey! As sure as day follows night, Michelle, with her ultra positive outlook and jovial attitude, will win her battle.

When Michelle learned that Jaqui, Yvonne, and I were going out, she insisted on joining us — with the tubes and all still hooked to her body, having just gone through an operation. Her sisters cautioned to tame our laughter as Michelle might laugh out loud, and it was not good for her that time. Another time, after Michelle finished her chemotherapy, she joined us again, and went up and down the stairs faster than we did, much to the consternation and worry of her sisters. Amazing is her zest for life, her guts, courage, and infinite faith.

While I shared the Laughter Yoga session with all the participants, I dedicated it wholeheartedly to Michelle and to those similarly situated. Laughter releases a tremendous amount of endorphins, our body’s natural painkillers. According to studies, one hour of laughter relieves a cancer patient of pain for about an hour without taking painkillers. Laughter drives all negative thoughts and ill feelings away because of the feel-good hormones that it releases and boosts the immune system, too! After asking the participants for three aching and painful body parts, we did the Aches and Pain Laughter by touching the three named-body parts laughingly — to release endorphins that banish aches and pains away.

We also did the Argument Laughter, where participants were taught how to argue laughingly, not heatedly, because, like it or not, conflicts and arguments are part and parcel of our interaction with people in our daily grind. Everyone gamely practiced it laughingly to the tempo of hoho, hahaha.

Here are some feel-good-inspiring comments:

Joanna Marie Cruz: This activity is highly recommended for bonding and laughing with friends. It is truly helpful for physical, emotional, and mental health.

Mary Rose Dorado: I’ll recommend this de-stressing activity to all my HR colleagues.

Peachy Ann Guanlao: Laughter Yoga can be added to the activities we do to create natural laughter for everyone.

Boy Martinez: Made me feel younger.

Janice Quillo: It made me feel so relaxed and stress-free. It made me happy the whole day.

Source: http://www.philstar.com/health-and-family/2012-11-13/865912/dazzling-laughter-miladay-jewels